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Author Topic: Round 3 Pairings - Round 2 Decisions  (Read 2727 times)
glarson
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« on: October 05, 2013, 11:59:42 AM »

attached

* Kentucky Round 3.pdf (11.56 KB - downloaded 511 times.)
* Kentucky Round 2.pdf (13.95 KB - downloaded 474 times.)
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CouldaBeenaContenda
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« Reply #1 on: October 05, 2013, 01:42:34 PM »

I'll bite.  Why did two teams get byes in the first and second rounds?
« Last Edit: October 05, 2013, 07:12:11 PM by CouldaBeenaContenda » Logged

Dover (New Hampshire) High School debate team, 1967-1970
Dover High School Debate Coach, 1970-1971
University of New Hampshire debate team, 1970 (when we still spoke like human beings)
University of New Hampshire debate team, 1980-1981 (and when we didn't)
UNH assistant debate coach, 1980-1981
kelly young
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« Reply #2 on: October 05, 2013, 02:00:03 PM »

I'm not there but I do recall seeing a message that the one team is taking the LSAT in the morning. The other might be the same or simply the left over team.

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glarson
Sr. Member
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Posts: 477


« Reply #3 on: October 05, 2013, 02:15:29 PM »

Kelly's right.

One team took the LSAT getting a 1-1 record for those two rounds (even though both show up as byes).  That left an odd number of teams actually debating.  So the pairing looks like it has two byes.
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CouldaBeenaContenda
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Posts: 73


« Reply #4 on: October 05, 2013, 03:29:26 PM »

When I debated eons ago, the host school ordinarily furnished a swingteam to guarantee a full slate of rounds for every entrant.  

In fact, in 1970, my school was in an NDT topic tournament at Brown University in which one opponent refused to debate my school's other, two-man pair because it was running an unconventional case back in the era when that was considered unethical by some, and not only did the negative refuse to debate it, the judge said, "I don't blame you" and gave my school's team the loss.  The topic that year was that the federal government should enact a program of compulsory wage and price controls, and since the negatives were hammering the conventional, broad cases, a lot of teams in desperation were advocating controlling just a few prices and wages, and our second team's case was worse than most.  Since the current high school topic was for further pollution control, there was enough evidence readily available from high school topic debate handbooks to support an "effluent fee" case, which put a unit price on pollution that a company might want to discharge.

Our coach let the tournament administration know that he was very displeased with that judge's ruling, and so Brown hastily assembled a makeshift team to participate in a "make-up" round with our spurned team that concluded at about midnight, as there had already been five scheduled preliminary rounds that day.  I see that one of the members of that make-shift swing team is a College Policy Debate Forums member and occasional poster here.

BTW, as I recall, the affirmative case that won the NDT that year had a plan to control the prices that were charged in company stores on large farms for products sold to their migrant farm workers, and maybe some other provision getting those workers a more reliable minimum wage.  Controlling inflation following the Guns and Butter economic policies of the late 1960s was such a timely and vexing problem that the Nixon Administration was seriously considering wage and price controls, and someone in the Treasury Department actually obtained a transcript of that final round to see what they might learn from it, but all they could have learned was that by 1971, intercollegiate policy debate had truly lost its way.
« Last Edit: May 20, 2015, 08:04:58 AM by CouldaBeenaContenda » Logged

Dover (New Hampshire) High School debate team, 1967-1970
Dover High School Debate Coach, 1970-1971
University of New Hampshire debate team, 1970 (when we still spoke like human beings)
University of New Hampshire debate team, 1980-1981 (and when we didn't)
UNH assistant debate coach, 1980-1981
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