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Author Topic: Gregg Hartney  (Read 6360 times)
SherryHall
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« Reply #60 on: October 26, 2016, 05:05:28 PM »

Chris Cook

No doubt at all that you are living up to his legacy. None. I know the only person close to as happy as he was when you took the cphs job was me. And I was equally sad when you left. Gregg had the utmost respect for you and I sense that what you're building at union is in the same vein as what gregg did at ss and Jenks. I am so grateful for your work and commitment and I know gregg felt that way too. It was nice to see you last week...we had such a good time w our little novices. Peace.
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SherryHall
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« Reply #61 on: October 26, 2016, 05:05:59 PM »

Joe Hinman

Greg was an old friend. I knew him in 75-85 when I was in college debate and after judging in the n.Texas area. We both debated for UT Arlington but he was gone by the time i came along. He was coaching at O.D. Wyatt in Ft Worth.we judged together a lot and saw each other at tournaments. He was great guy fine coach and excellent judge. good fried. I was out of touch with him for a long time but got back in touch around 2010 or so. I am devastated to hear I just found out on FB minutes ago.
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SherryHall
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« Reply #62 on: October 26, 2016, 05:06:46 PM »

Jeanette Smith


"If you can't dazzle them with your brilliance, then baffle them with your bullshit." Gregg Hartney was my Debate Coach at IHS before he left us for greener pastures and eventually ended up in the Jenks Oklahoma school system.

Gregg retired a few years ago, and yesterday was tragically killed in a car accident.

I'm stunned.

I just spent quite some time reading through the tribute posts on his Facebook page. Posts from former students, other coaches, and those he met and impacted through his 40+ years of teaching and coaching.

I can say, without hesitation or question, that Gregg Hartney FUNDAMENTALLY changed who I am as a person. Suddenly, all those questions I asked weren't annoying, they were an asset. And the fact that I tended to speak at warp speed didn't result in someone saying, "What did you say? Slow down! Say that again!" Instead, it resulted in trophies and top speaker awards.

Amazing.

Gregg taught me that there was no need to sit down and shut up. That it was utterly okay to STAND UP AND BE HEARD.

He once told me that debate was, in a nutshell, "Oral term paper writing". He was right!

I left debate the year after he left IHS because the woman who replaced him simply COULDN'T. Nobody was Gregg Hartney. PERIOD.

I resumed debating in college, and the lessons I learned from Gregg as a Freshman and Sophomore in high school carried me through college and beyond.

He taught me to think critically. To rely on EVIDENCE, not rumor. To be able to back up what I said with PROOF, and not to tolerate bullshit.

(Oh...and he taught me to spread a lovely layer of BS over a situation (especially during CX) so that I would have time to research and defend my position without having to lie or flip-flop on a point.)

God bless you Gregg. May your eternity be filled with winning rounds, laughter, great discussions, and just enough crazy people to give you something to talk about!

You'll be missed.

My love and prayers go out to his family, and to all of us who considered ourselves part of his extended family.

The world will be a little quieter from here on out.
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SherryHall
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« Reply #63 on: October 26, 2016, 05:07:58 PM »

Kim Fisher Wallace

About 8 years ago, I was introduced to the world of high school speech and debate when I volunteered to be a judge for the Talihina speech team. At one of the first meets we went to, I recognized a teacher from my own high school days. By chance, we ended up judging a round together. I was still learning how to judge, and struck up a conversation with the man I recognized. He confirmed that he was in fact Mr. Hartney, formerly of CPHS. He was very kind and gave me advice on what to look for as I judged. I still use the system he showed me when I judge tournaments. We'd smile and nod when we saw each other over the next few years, but I didn't really get to know him until last year when I began working for Tulsa Public Schools. I wanted to keep working with speech and debate, and Gregg was spending his "retirement" recruiting kids for the Urban Debate League. Gregg came to our class several times to help our new debaters learn what to do. He was an invaluable help to me. Whether he was trying to teach kids to speak clearly (with a pencil in their mouth), getting them to read only what's in front of them (Green Eggs and Ham backward), telling stories of his younger days ("I once dated Chris Everett Lloyd") or telling guys the REAL reason for joining debate ("Girls! Girls everywhere you look!"), Gregg put his heart into everything he did. I feel so honored and blessed to have had the chance to work with him and get to know him. He was a good man with a true love for students. The world is a poorer place today. Thank you Gregg, for all you did. You will be missed.
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SherryHall
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« Reply #64 on: October 26, 2016, 05:09:35 PM »

Kim Fisher Wallace

About 8 years ago, I was introduced to the world of high school speech and debate when I volunteered to be a judge for the Talihina speech team. At one of the first meets we went to, I recognized a teacher from my own high school days. By chance, we ended up judging a round together. I was still learning how to judge, and struck up a conversation with the man I recognized. He confirmed that he was in fact Mr. Hartney, formerly of CPHS. He was very kind and gave me advice on what to look for as I judged. I still use the system he showed me when I judge tournaments. We'd smile and nod when we saw each other over the next few years, but I didn't really get to know him until last year when I began working for Tulsa Public Schools. I wanted to keep working with speech and debate, and Gregg was spending his "retirement" recruiting kids for the Urban Debate League. Gregg came to our class several times to help our new debaters learn what to do. He was an invaluable help to me. Whether he was trying to teach kids to speak clearly (with a pencil in their mouth), getting them to read only what's in front of them (Green Eggs and Ham backward), telling stories of his younger days ("I once dated Chris Everett Lloyd") or telling guys the REAL reason for joining debate ("Girls! Girls everywhere you look!"), Gregg put his heart into everything he did. I feel so honored and blessed to have had the chance to work with him and get to know him. He was a good man with a true love for students. The world is a poorer place today. Thank you Gregg, for all you did. You will be missed.
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SherryHall
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« Reply #65 on: October 26, 2016, 05:10:49 PM »

Kandi King

A dear friend and colleague. . . I am so incredibly sad . . .
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SherryHall
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« Reply #66 on: October 26, 2016, 10:44:52 PM »

Joel Rollins


So one of my favorite Gregg Hartney stories. When he was in high school he was kicked out of his house for opposing the Vietnam war. While living out of his car, he wanted to debate so badly that he faked letterhead in order to enter tournaments. He lived and loved debate...
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SherryHall
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« Reply #67 on: October 26, 2016, 10:47:40 PM »

Nathan Eicher


A giant died this week and it was my sincerest pleasure to call him my teacher, my mentor, my boss and my friend.

But Gregg was more than that to me. He was mentor of my closest mentors in the debate activity. And although giants are rare, he was surrounded by them. Many of his peers and friends are giants as well. And I am fortunate to know some of them, and to call them my friends, my teachers and my mentors as well.

Gregg was in the business of making giants, taking people under his wing and propelling them to greatness. He improved the lives of countless numbers, to an an extent that that is difficult to fathom. The breadth and depth of his contribution to society are seldom ever achieved by an institution, let alone a single person.

We should all be so lucky to have a Gregg Hartney in our life.

The world would be a whole lot better if everyone strove to have the positive impact on a community that he did. We need more people with his heart, integrity, dedication, intelligence, compassion, service and values.

I would like to close with one quote that he told me several years back that has informed my life and teaching to this day. To the best of my recollection it is this, "The kids who don't win often get the most out of this activity. The ones who win were always going to be successful in life, with or without our help. Coaching is about the whole squad, not just your top teams."
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SherryHall
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« Reply #68 on: October 26, 2016, 10:49:35 PM »

https://www.gofundme.com/gregg-hartney-family-expenses-2w4mbac



On October 25th, 2016, Mr Gregg Hartney was killed in a car accident. Gregg had spent 40 years as a public school teacher, teaching Speech, Debate and Government. After retiring, Gregg remained active in the debate community, assisting with a new Urban Debate League in Tulsa and helping with local tournaments. He was a mentor for thousands of people.

 

He leaves behind a wife, Kathryn, and two daughters Hannah and Leah. This fund is set up to help with final expenses, travel arrangements for his family, and assistance with income replacement. Remaining funds will be placed in a scholarship fund for debate students, which will be set up through the school where he retired.
Help spread the word!
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SherryHall
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« Reply #69 on: October 27, 2016, 12:28:00 PM »

Robert Lawrence


Iím going two off then case.

First, it wouldnít be a speech from me without a topicality argument soÖWebsterís online defines a mentor as someone who teaches or gives help and advice to a less experienced or younger person. Clearly, that describes Gregg. Only my parents had a larger impact on my growth and development than he did. My parents taught me right and wrong, but they didnít use Immanuel Kant and the categorical imperative to do it. They taught me how to change my oil and adjust the points in the truck, but it didnít devolve into Heidegger or a discussion about how mechanical starters would still work after a nuclear war. Debaters LOVE to talk about nuclear war. They taught me that I should never start a fight, but that if I found myself in one it was better to be the guy standing afterwards. Gregg taught me how to, more often than not, keep words from becoming blows. And he kept being there for me long after his teaching obligation was over. 10 years after I graduated high school, he was at my fatherís funeral. He hugged me and told me it would be ok. 10 years after that, he was at my motherís funeral. Again, he hugged me and told me it would be ok. The morning I proposed to my wife, I was nervous and shaking. He was there to hug me and told me it would be ok. Mr. Hartney, I need you today to hug me, and tell me it will be ok. (Voter for fairness and education.)

Second off. Social movements. The link is simple, Gregg has been a catalyst for social change for as long as Iíve known him, and apparently long before that. Not just political change, though he had his opinions there as well. Social change. His goal was to make changes one person at a time. Teach them how to be a team. How to win. How to lose. He taught us what it meant to be a part of something larger than ourselves. Just some silly debate team, arguing about nanotech and welfare reform. Yes, they ARE connected. But the lesson had nothing to do with trophies. Each of us has been part of a team since then. Each of us has had to work towards a goal with others, together. And because we learned how much impact one person can have on us, weíve gone on and tried to make a positive impact on others. Like a dandelion whose spores blow in the wind, his influence has spread far and wide, and taken root. Impact? The impact is also easy to see. Just look around at the people he has influenced, who have then influenced others. His studentís studentís students are teaching others today.

Next, the case debate. Significance. For as much as he loved debate, and his debate family, and for as many of us who think of him as a surrogate father, itís important to remember he WAS a father. I was in high school when Hannah was born. Until then, the man I knew was competitive, gruff, driven, loud, and kind of scary. After he became a father, there was a running joke on our team about who was going to ask about new baby pictures today. He became putty in our nefarious, and rather lazy, hands. It was easy to get him talking about his new baby and not about health care or prison overcrowding. For all the trips all over the country, the cheap hotels and lousy food, the week-long camps, the late nights and early mornings and hour upon hour in the library, never doubt the love that he had for his family.

Finally, normally this would be the point where I would give you a call to action. Vote aff, or neg. But this isnít quite that kind of speech. Instead, the call to action is this: Leave the world better than you found it. Find a problem youíre passionate about and work to fix it, whether it affects one person or a thousand. Let that be the legacy of Gregg Hartney.

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SherryHall
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« Reply #70 on: October 27, 2016, 12:28:44 PM »

Angela Graham

Getting to the heart of the matter, thanks for your eloquence sir. He was already a dad when I met him. One of the first things he did when I met him at Debate camp was tell to introduce himself to us. He started with his wife and daughters, and not a whole lot else. That's what he was, a dad, a husband. If we stuck it out long enough, we got to know the other things he was too. My first job was babysitting his girls.
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SherryHall
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« Reply #71 on: October 28, 2016, 07:08:09 AM »

Mercedes Lea Millberry Fowler

For those who would like to attend, Gregg Hartney's memorial celebration will be held on Sunday, Oct. 30 at 1 p.m. at the Jenks HS Performing Arts Center, 398 W F St, Jenks, OK 74037. Trying to reach out those from my era or in my circles, though some of you have already been a part of the planning. Feel free to share with others.
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