Author Topic: Scott Deatherage  (Read 121864 times)

SherryHall

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Re: Scott Deatherage
« Reply #90 on: December 28, 2009, 10:10:35 PM »
From David Coale:

1(a). Summer of 1984, Waco, Texas. Baylor Debate Workshop. Professor Rowland introduced the staff. For all but one, he used names ("Mark Dyer," "Lyn Robbins," etc.) That one staff member, however, he introduced as "The Forensic Waterfowl." "That's funny," I thought to myself, "did he just call that ...guy a duck?!"
1(b). Duck's lab, called "The Death Squad," wins the tournament and almost every other trophy available to win.

2. Duck, using irrefutable logic with the students at another Baylor Debate Workshop: "I know the basketball camp people make a lot of noise dribbling at night. But that does not mean you can hit them with pillows!"

3(a). 1989 NDT, double-octos, Miami of Ohio. Redlands 5, Harvard 0.
3(b). Roughly fifteen years later, dinner with Duck and Sherry Hall. "Hey," he says over salad, "remember that double-octo debate you lost so badly?"

SherryHall

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Re: Scott Deatherage
« Reply #91 on: December 28, 2009, 10:11:30 PM »
From Steven Deatherage:

As Scott's nephew, I'm truly thankful for everyone who is sharing their memories of Scott. I have learned SO much about a person who always remained mysterious to me. Our family, here in Houston, is in awe over the outpouring of love that he is receiving from all of his friends and loved ones accross the country.

SherryHall

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Re: Scott Deatherage
« Reply #92 on: December 28, 2009, 10:12:41 PM »
From Todd Fine:

I would like to recall "the speech" that a number of people have mentioned... And I would be interested in learning more about its history and evolution.

Its lessons had great influence on me when I experienced it as a rising high school junior at the Zarefsky Scholars Institute at Northwestern in 1997. He delivered thi...s session-culminating address with such gravity and passion, communicating that seeking excellence in debate was a dead serious endeavor. I recall him looking at the debaters directly in the eyes, overcoming his usual shyness. I remember feeling personally challenged, committing myself to meet the high expectations he set. Looking around the room, I could feel an entire cohort of young debaters do the same.

Is there a full verbatim transcript or a video of "the speech" in existence that could be posted? Experiencing it seems to have become a rite of passage in debate, and I would hope it could be forever available to other young debaters.

SherryHall

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Re: Scott Deatherage
« Reply #93 on: December 28, 2009, 10:14:18 PM »
From the NAUDL:
A site has been set up for Scott at: http://www.urbandebate.org/inmemoryofscottdeatherage.shtml

The NAUDL's Executive Director, life-long educator, and our friend and colleague Larry Scott Deatherage passed away the morning of December 25, 2009. He was 47 and died of cardiac arrest.

Throughout his life, Scott believed in the ability of debate to transform the lives of students. As a Northwestern University faculty member, Scott taught countless students the power of sharp thinking, persuasive communication, and argumentation. As Director of the Northwestern University Debate Society, Scott was one of the most successful coaches - if not the most successful coach - in college debate history. As the Executive Director of the NAUDL, Scott turned his extraordinary talent and focus to helping extend learning opportunities to students who might not otherwise have access to debate. Under his leadership, the NAUDL built institutions that will continue to provide life-trajectory changing intellectual challenges to thousands upon thousands of urban students across the country for years to come. His life, and his commitment to that work, came to a close all too prematurely.

Scott's family posted the following on the afternoon of December 25:

As most of you know by now, Scott passed away early this morning. In his last two days, he was surrounded by friends and loved ones. Scott's family is working to deal with the immediate practical challenges of this tragedy, and has not yet set a time or place for a funeral or memorial service. Plans for those events, however, are in the works for the near future, and we will make sure you are all informed as soon as they are finalized. Thank you all for your continued patience and support - it has meant the world to Scott's family.

The NAUDL will update information on this page regarding memorial services in Scott’s honor as it becomes available. You may also be interested in visiting discussions on the College Policy Debate Forums site and Facebook. At both sites, Scott’s friends and colleagues have shared memories and have paid tribute to him, and additional information about the memorial services will be posted there as well.

On the heels of this tragic loss, please join us in remembering with admiration Scott’s remarkable life and work.

The NAUDL Board and Staff

lukephill

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Re: Scott Deatherage
« Reply #94 on: December 29, 2009, 12:42:25 AM »
From Matt Reedy:

The first time I met the Duck was when I attended the Coon my Junior Year of high school. Listening to him speak during camp was one of the big motivations in my decision to apply to NU early decision-simply being around the Duck and a program that, for me at least, defined debate, was one I could not pass up. Among many, three stories stick out.
After the first day of Kentucky my freshman year, my partner Randall and I stood at a quality 0-4. We clearly weren't so psyched about how the day went and while moving our boxes from the room to our bus the Duck sought us out. I don't remember his exact words, but I knew, after him talking to us, the outcome didn't matter.
It was during the Roger's House of my sophomore year that I was going to quit the team, for a variety of reasons. It took a great while to prepare myself to deliver the news to the Duck, because I knew that I wouldn't able to stick with it faced with his persuasive skills. Just a kid from Kansas (something he reminded me of OFTEN-I guess there was some other Kansan that debated at NU...) I was never going to win much, nor could I prolifically cut cards (the best file I ever produced was two Project Prometheus cards), but in spite of that the Duck, armed with a gigantic pitcher of iced tea, reminded me that there was a place for me-that I belonged. It wasn't for long, but during that conversation the Duck made me feel like I was a part of the team. My greatest accomplishment during my time at NU was that I got to carry the boxes of two NDT champion teams. For me, because of the inspiration of the Duck, that was enough. Just being a part of the team, the history, the legacy the Duck created was all I could ask for.
While not related to debate (directly), I will never ever forget the time I spent at the Wise Fools. Those ridiculous nights spent drinking Markers Mark straight (if the Duck could do it, why couldn't I?) were, to the extent I can actually remember what happened, unforgettable. By far my favorite interaction was one of the most recent nights where several of us were sitting around debating the timeless issue of "what television character would you marry?" With Branson shamelessly defending Jenny Garth from 90210 (JENNY GARTH OUT OF EVERYONE EVER!) the Duck waddled over, and upon hearing what we were talking about loudly muttered something about how we were idiots and all our choices-obviously-sucked.
Just a few of the many things I'll remember about the Duck. He will be missed by not only those who directly knew him, but every collegiate debater past, present and future.

SherryHall

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Re: Scott Deatherage
« Reply #95 on: December 29, 2009, 08:13:16 AM »
From the Chicago Sun Times, December 29, 2009: 
http://www.suntimes.com/news/obituaries/1962574,CST-NWS-xdeatherage29.article

Nation's top debate coach
Left NU to aid urban high school efforts

December 29, 2009
BY MAUREEN O'DONNELL Staff Reporter modonnell@suntimes.com

As L. Scott Deatherage lay ailing at Northwestern Memorial Hospital after a heart attack, the electronic drumbeat began.

Across the globe, former students of the legendary debate coach at Northwestern University began texting, e-mailing and telephoning. They called his hospital room from Hong Kong, Harvard University, California, Colorado. Some drove in or flew in from Michigan, Minnesota, Philadelphia and Washington, D.C.

As the students he once coached and members of his family gathered at his bedside, they read him every text message. They held the phone to his ear so his debaters could thank him one last time.

"You were a father to me," some said. And: "You changed my life."

Mr. Deatherage, widely considered the nation's top debate coach, died on Christmas Day after suffering a heart attack two days earlier. He was 47.

"There are 150 urban public schools that have debate programs as a result of his work with the National Association for Urban Debate Leagues," said Eric Tucker, deputy director of the organization, which Mr. Deatherage joined last year as executive director after leaving Northwestern.

He began coaching debate at Northwestern University in 1986 and became director of its Debate Society in 1990. Seven times, his team won the National Debate Tournament, the Super Bowl of debate for college and university students. He also coached four debaters to individual "top speaker" awards and was voted "Coach of the Decade" for the 1990s by his peers.

"His record as a debate coach will be the standard by which future debate coaches will be measured," said Leonard Gail, who chairs the National Association for Urban Debate Leagues, which is based in Chicago.

Mr. Deatherage's imposing frame was matched by his generosity of spirit, friends said. He didn't yell. He encouraged, getting students to believe in themselves.

LaTonya Starks was one. The former Morgan Park High School student, raised by her grandmother, caught his eye during a Chicago Debate League competition.

"There was an aura around him," Starks said. "There was talk before you got to an event that 'Scott Deatherage is going to be there.' People talked about how many national debate tournaments he had won and how, if he believed in you, it could change your life."

He found money to help her attend Northwestern, where she became an assistant debate director. "He was the first person in debate to tell me that I could be great," Starks said.

He'd give students what came to be known as "The Speech" -- a call to excellence that grew to have a near-mythic reputation.

"They remember it all of their lives," said Dan Shalmon, past associate director of Northwestern's debate team. "It was about how being great at debate could make you great at life. . . . The four pillars were teamwork, hard work, character and commitment."

Mr. Deatherage, a Texas native, lost his mother at 14 and his father at 16. Debate became his anchor. "He had this to hang onto," said his sister, Diana Baldwin.

He received bachelor's and master's degrees from Baylor University and a doctorate from Northwestern.

Mr. Deatherage -- known affectionately as "Duck" because he walked like one -- counseled other debate coaches on budgets and fund-raising and whatever else they needed to know.

"The coach at Michigan State told me there would not be a debate team at Michigan State if not for Scott," Shalmon said. "No one did more to support debate at Berkeley from outside than Scott."

Mr. Deatherage is also survived by four brothers: Donald, Michael and Patrick Deatherage and William Lechner.

A service is planned for Texas, as well as a larger tribute in the Chicago area at a future date.
L. SCOTT DEATHERAGE | 1962-2009:




SherryHall

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Re: Scott Deatherage
« Reply #96 on: December 29, 2009, 08:25:56 AM »
From the Chicago Tribune, December 29, 2009:

LARRY SCOTT DEATHERAGE 1962-2009
Larry Scott Deatherage, 1962-2009: Noted debate coach, formerly of Northwestern University

By Alejandra Cancino

Tribune reporter

December 29, 2009

Larry Scott Deatherage was widely considered one of the top collegiate debate coaches in the nation.

Mr. Deatherage led the Northwestern University Debate Society to seven national championships as director from 1990 to 2008.

"If you think the NCAA basketball tournament for college, it's essentially the debate form of that," said LaTonya Starks, who was recruited by Mr. Deatherage in high school.

Mr. Deatherage, 47, died Friday, Dec. 25, in Northwestern Memorial Hospital after a heart attack Dec. 22.

He was known for pushing his students to reach their full potential.

"He believed very strongly in debate and what it could do for students -- how valuable it was for their education," said David Zarefsky, who hired Mr. Deatherage when he was the dean of the university's School of Communication.

Starks said Mr. Deatherage instilled grace and integrity in his students. To them, "Duck" was a legend, mentor and friend.

"He was not only a coach for me, but he was one of those people who whatever you needed he would do that for you, and he became a father to me," Starks said.

Mr. Deatherage was born in Houston and was the youngest of six siblings.

"He was always very opinionated as a child, and as he was growing up and as an adult," said Diana Baldwin, Mr. Deatherage's sister.

He received a bachelor's degree in economics and a master's degree in communication studies from Baylor University in Waco, Texas. He moved to Chicago in the mid-1980s to attend Northwestern University, where he got a doctorate in communication studies.

In 2003, Mr. Deatherage was named the Pelham National Coach of the Year. Four years later, he was named the Ziegelmueller National Debate Tournament Coach of the Year. In 2008, he left Northwestern to be executive director of the National Organization for Urban Debate Leagues.

"Scott had seen debate make a tremendous difference in the life of college and high school students and wanted to make sure that that same opportunity was available to women and students of color in working-class schools," said Eric Tucker, the association's deputy director and chief academic officer.

Tucker said Mr. Deatherage's leadership gave 150 urban public high schools nationwide access to debate.

"The debate community and even the urban education reform community has lost a powerful advocate and friend," Tucker said.

Mr. Deatherage also is survived by his brothers, Donald, Patrick, Michael and William Lechner.

Details for services are pending.

SherryHall

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Re: Scott Deatherage
« Reply #97 on: December 29, 2009, 08:35:56 AM »
From Cori Dauber:

Memorial: I have received a number of inquiries as to why no additional information about a memorial has been forthcoming. Several of us have been working with the family on the memorial, at Scott’s request, but we want this to be a true celebration of Scott’s life – and scheduling just gets complicated as we try to balance the needs of several different groups. (And to be honest it just took us a day or two to get our bearings.) As soon as we get a date, we need to be sure the venue we want is available on that date, but we’re very close. As soon as we have the announcement, it will be posted here, and on all the various list serves that are relevant. Thank you all, so much, for your expressions of care and concern.

SherryHall

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Re: Scott Deatherage
« Reply #98 on: December 29, 2009, 09:43:20 AM »
From David Rhaesa:

"I met Duck at the KU Fall tournament freshman year.  He stayed at our apartment.  I took him and Bob Mackey and a couple other young Bears to The Hawk and we all got very drunk.  The next morning the Bears could barely debate they were so hungover.  The Head Jayhawk was not pleased with me.  We didn't debate that often - two or three times - which seems strange given that we were in the same circles.  I've known what a great coach he was, but never knew in what way he was a great coach until this week as I read the testimonials.  I remember once overhearing someone asking him about me (at a time when I was job hunting).  He said some good things and then mentioned that I was irresponsible.  I thought more of him for being honest."

SherryHall

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Re: Scott Deatherage
« Reply #99 on: December 29, 2009, 10:06:24 AM »
From Josh Zive:

On the island of misfit toys that is college debate, the Duck felt like
a kindred spirit to me.  We were both large, loud,  and comfortable
being very emotional.  Throughout my years in debate, the voice and
visage of the Duck would become one of the touchstones that would let me
know I was in a friendly place--even when that voice and visage were not
being particularly friendly at the time.

I did not know the Duck as debater--I knew him as a coach and judge.
And while the Duck and I disagreed on a wide variety of issues, I always
loved listening to the Duck talk about the things he really loved, his
debaters and the people that make up the history of NDT debate.

A few months ago I found myself sitting at a bar downstairs from my
office with the Duck.  We were supposed to be talking about something
else (likely me giving money to NAUDL), but as I expected, the
conversation turned to our favorite topic--debaters and debates from the
past. What was supposed to be a 15-minute drink turned into a couple of
hours of Duck and I trying to out hyperbolize each other about the
people we loved from debate.

As the conversation continued, we ended up (as we always did) on our
favorite topic to discuss---Mike Gottleib.  Everyone knew that Mike was
a Kansas kid who turned into one of the best debaters ever under the
Duck, but the Duck knew that some of us in Lawrence always rooted for
Mike like he was a blood relative.  Bragging on Mike was easy, but
listening to the Duck talk about Mike could make you feel better even if
you had no idea who Mike was.   When the Duck talked about his former
debaters it was infused with a type of pride and love that is
unmistakable to me now that I have become a father.  For me, a
conversation with the Duck about former debaters was more than a war
story, it was ritual in community. Those conversations could remind you
of how much you loved your coaches as a debater, and how much you loved
your debaters as a coach.  I will miss those conversations because the
Duck understood something that took me a long time to appreciate---that
while personal success in debate is a lot of fun, there is nothing more
rewarding than investing your passion into someone else and watching
them accomplish things you never could.

The last quiet time I spent with the Duck was sitting on the rooftop
patio of Frank Cross's abode in Austin during the NDT.  I remember
sitting with the Duck, Scott Segal, Frank, and Robin Rowland telling war
stories, talking crap, and having fun.  I also remember looking across
the table at Duck and realizing that although we were very different, he
looked genuinely happy and relaxed in ways that were oddly familiar to
me.  I believe that the familiarity grew from a shared sense that being
in the company of our debate friends was often the only place we really
felt relaxed and happy.  That although we certainly love and appreciate
our families and friends not in debate, that the people in debate were
family in every sense that the word family really matters. In the end,
for many of us the people who coached us, that we coached, and that we
competed against are where we find shelter from the storm.


Sitting on that patio laughing, I realized that although there are many
people who knew Duck better than I did, he was a part of my family.  The
Duck was a debater, a coach, and a friend. I miss him.  Some people do
debate.  People like the Duck are debate.

lukephill

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Re: Scott Deatherage
« Reply #100 on: December 29, 2009, 10:24:34 AM »
From Karen Scott:

OPRF had a lot of interaction with the NU Debate team, so for as long as I can remember I was in awe of the Duck. Like others, I felt a need to impress him even though he wasn’t my coach. Imagine my delight when he invited me to teach at the Coon Hardy. I felt like Sally Field when she accepted that Oscar, “He likes me, he really likes me!” Despite spending the last few days trying to think of a time where I actually did impress him, only this memory comes to mind…we were discussing the logistics of the students’ day off and trip into Chicago. I remembered when I attended the institute Duck gave us a stern warning that members of his staff would be riding the El, and that if any of us were caught on a train, we would be sent home. Thinking I was doing him a favor, I eagerly volunteered to forgo a day of rest and ride the El all afternoon. He paused, gave me a look, and said, “You actually thought we DID that!?” He shook his head in dismay and gave me a huge laugh.

Years later I saw him at Adri and Judd’s wedding. For whatever reason, I didn’t think he’d remember me much, so I gave him a sheepish “hello” and thought that would probably be it. Again, to my delight, he gave me a huge hug, asked how I was doing, and we chatted like old friends. That was the last time I saw him and I wish, now more than ever, I had taken him up on his offer to email him and stay in touch.
Thoughts and prayers to all of you mourning his loss.

nsmith

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Re: Scott Deatherage
« Reply #101 on: December 29, 2009, 12:29:21 PM »
Duck was never listening to any old Whitesnake, it was always "Here I Go Again (on my own)."  It was his soundtrack, and it was playing in his head through the best and the worst of times.  He probably heard it in his final moments of awareness.

I think Duck always felt fundamentally alone in making his way in this world.  It explains why he was always there for others when they went through tough times.

This link below is to a version that is acoustic, and the Duck would not approve, but I don't feel much like rocking out today.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=efZzYBMDxv0


(S)NATE




r wood

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Re: Scott Deatherage
« Reply #102 on: December 29, 2009, 03:03:09 PM »
From David Rhaesa:

Hi, David.  How's life treating you?

Robert Wood

BrandonFletcher

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Re: Scott Deatherage
« Reply #103 on: December 29, 2009, 04:07:12 PM »
Goodbye Duck. All of us together will struggle to make up for a tiny fraction of the passion, spirit, and love you brought to debate and those entwined with it. You offered your great heart to so many of us lost, lonely, misfit, beaten, and simply forgotten. There is so little of you that could be truly lost because you constantly gave yourself away. Among kings, you are a legend. Enjoy a rest in blessed peace. Tears for now-Thanks forever. Brandon

lukephill

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Re: Scott Deatherage
« Reply #104 on: December 29, 2009, 04:21:26 PM »
I have spent the past 5 days in Louisiana, surrounded by friends and family but unquestionably lonely and disconnected.  I love these people and thank them for supporting me during this very tough time.  However, I can honestly say that I have lost the most significant figure in my adult life and I can’t believe that the words that I write now will truly encompass his awesome influence on my life and that of so many others.  Reading the stories and tidbits that others have offered has helped me to put off this explanation and helped me realize, wonderfully, that I was not alone in being so deeply and profoundly affected by my relationship with Scott.  I can honestly say that I would not be doing anything professionally that I do know or do them how I do them without his intervention.  I love my job, I love the Wildcats (they better do well in Tampa!), and I love debate almost entirely as a result one large goofy man who I was terrified of as a freshman in college who I am now proud to call friend and mentor.

A few vignettes into our strange journey:

1)   As a freshman at the Roger’s House I tried to stay low and avoid being noticed.  I was thrilled enough to be a member of the nationally acclaimed Northwestern Debate society I was just trying to avoid being cut.   I still have full notebook of thoughts from the event including the 2 DAYS of lectures from Duck on the nature of federal control in relation to Native Americans.  SOVEREIGN-ITY NOW!    That was before we talked about possible affs on the topic.  .The greatest lesson I took away from the event was the necessity of preparation.  Every day an upperclassman would come in and present an affirmative idea for the room to review.  Duck would tear through them like a hot knife through butter.  Some he would be more excited about than others, but non was near its final product and Duck would let folks know.  “Wow”, I thought “those looked like good affs to me, what was I missing?”   Duck always had a way of looking ahead, seeing all the angles.  And even if he could not express that to you immediately, he knew and you knew that you had missed something.  Second lesson, it’s all about the details.  My first serious interaction with the Duck was a practice round he judged.  We were all first year debaters and it was not a great round.  I cannot forget Duck stopping me during me the cross-ex of the 1ac after I had mis-phrased a question, “DUDE! This is college THE PLAN says, THE PLAN does…”  He took the time to remind a dumb freshman from Louisiana on proper grammar in my cross ex!  Preparation and the details matter from the Roger’s House to the NDT.

2)   I will always remember the first time that I thought Duck knew who I was (knowing him he had some ideas about me long before hand).  We were in the middle of a freshman lecture about imbedded clash and he posed a question to the group about how to rephrase a link argument more efficiently.  I shyly raised my hand and ventured a guess.  Duck stares down for the white board in his slightly hunched over manner and stares for a moment.  “Luke, I guess you’re not as dumb as you look”, he remarks and the lecture rolls on.  The first compliment I ever received from the man who I can now call a great friend and mentor.  I loved that respect and admiration was earned from the Duck, never given freely, but once earned very hard to lose.  I slowly built up a lot of credibility with the Duck, being is personal driver for a while will do that. 

3)   I’m not sure if he liked my intellect, my determination or something else, but after 4 years of debating for the man one day I found Duck coming to me for advice on whether after graduation my partner from the previous year should be lined up for the  B team.  As a recent college graduate with no coaching experience at any level I was shocked and amazed that the Duck would come to me for anything debate related let alone thoughts on pairing a team in line for a first round.  I gave him my thoughts and cheered loudly for NU DD all the way to the Octos of the 2006 NDT.  Duck was the first person to ever hire me as a coach or lab instructor.  I’m pretty sure he saw my future in debate coaching long before I did.  I remember a very long conversation before my senior year in college talking about the possibility of coaching and seriously worrying because of my lack of competitive success, that I could not stand up to other peers (to be fair I graduated with a pretty talented young debater from San Antonio).  Duck looked down at me from his bar stool and I could tell the look behind his eyes, “Dude, are you kidding me?”  He then went on to list a number of current and former coaches that excelled regardless of their competitive past.  This conversation in many ways gave me permission to try and become a debate coach and ignore the path to law school that I had seen myself on for many years.  I thank him for that.

4)   I missed a phone call from Duck and he left me a voicemail.  I had been busy leading a novice debate meeting at the Hooch (teaching novice debate was a passion we shared) and assumed Duck just wanted to chat about travel or some logistical matter.  I opened the voice mail and was greeted by excited Duck.  You know, the Duck who was loud and articulate and punching his words.  He was letting me know about a freshman debater I had coached previously.  She had just presented on a proposed Afghanistan Aff at the Roger’s House and quite simply Duck was blown away.  Using terms of high Duck compliment like “complete package” “home run” and “A PLUS” throughout the message.  I kept that voice mail for a long time.  It was a mini-version of the speech to me.  I subtle reminder of the power of debate.  If I felt down or didn’t remember why I was doing what I was doing I would hit replay.  Duck’s voice coming over the line would remind that I could do could and in the future could do better.  Duck always managed to let you know when you did good, even if you missed it yourself.

5)   The last real conversation Duck and I had was shortly after I picked him up from surgery this December.  We were waiting on his prescription and I could see that he was in pain.  He sat awkwardly in my car and hummed along with the classic rock.  Desperately trying to take his mind off the pain and his medical problems I spun the conversation to something I knew could take his mind away.  The Dallas Cowboys.  He outlined each of the Cowboys upcoming opponents and broke down their playoff chances (Sorry Branson, he was not optimistic).  He complimented me on the Saints season so far and how his Cowboys had no chance against us.  Two weeks later the Cowboys ended the Saint’s chances at an undefeated season.  I never got a call from Duck pointing out that fact.  I’m not sure what I would give for one more call from the man to gloat about a football victory or anything else.  Every conversation with the Duck mattered, you walked away knowing more than you went in and in some way better.

Larry Scott Deatherage is beyond defining in any single story or any single storyteller.  He was a loving, passionate, and loyal.  He was also a determined perfectionist who would let you know if you had not lived up to expectations.  No one worked harder.  No one enjoyed victory more.  More importantly no one enjoyed sharing debate with others more.  Duck always said that debate saved his life.  Thank you Duck for changing my life forever.  I will live each day trying to live the four pillars- character, commitment, team work and hard work.  I will not settle for good when I can be great.  I will be hard on myself when I didn’t give my best and easy on myself when my best wasn’t good enough.

Thank you Duck.  I love and miss you.

Luke Hill
Program Coordinator, Northwestern Debate
NU '05